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Raindrops, Floaters, and Other Things: Answers to Questions (part 2)

Published: 2022-11-20

The eyes aren’t just a mirror of the soul, but also could be an important attraction of the majority of systemic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, thyroid problems, arthritis, and a number of others manifested in the eyes. Therefore so often one of the first doctors to detect disease is the ophthalmologist.

Raindrops, Floaters, and Other Things: Answers to Questions (part 2)

Raindrops, Floaters, and Other Things: Answers to Questions (part 2)

 

Part 1

“So what about Raindrops, which are supposed to relieve presbyopia? Are they put in both eyes at once?”

No, only in the non-dominant eye. The implant has the same transparency as a human tear, so it doesn’t limit the amount of light reaching the retina. It helps change the shape of the cornea, which provides an improvement in vision at close and medium distances. An experienced surgeon makes it so that the implant does not wash away, as sometimes happens with inexperienced surgeons.

“What kind of specific results can you expect with Raindrop, and how long does the operation take?”

98% of patients are able to read the newspaper – 20/40 vision at close range. 88% can read the smallest font – 20/25 or even better at close distances. 76% can read emails on the computer, with the same 20/25 vision at mid-distances. This technology is an excellent option for surgical vision correction. The operation lasts 10 minutes, but I must mention that it is (for obvious reasons) not cheap, although judging by patients’ feedback it is worth it.

“Am I eligible for Raindrop?”

You don’t have any indication it’s needed. But for all of those who have age-related presbyopia, and don’t want to put up with it or deal with glasses, we are happy to help. As always, we guarantee our results.

“Is it true that all diseases “shine” in the eyes?”

Not all, but many, therefore I don’t have to repeat that it’s important to have modern diagnostic equipment. The eyes aren’t just the window to the soul. The majority of systemic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, thyroid problems, arthritis, and a number of others are manifested in the eyes. Often one of the first doctors to detect disease is the ophthalmologist. Moreover, people who are already aware that they have these or other diseases still need to see the ophthalmologist.

“I check my blood sugar at home, so why do I need to go to an ophthalmologist for this?”

To determine at what stage the disease is and how well it is controlled through treatment. Ophthalmologists see the broader picture. Diabetes affects many organs – the kidneys, the lungs, and even the brain. Loss of renal function, heart problems, and heart attacks – all these are consequences of diabetes.

“So a person may not know that the disease has reached a critical stage, but you can see that?”

A good endocrinologist reminds their patients that it’s necessary to see the ophthalmologist. So why is the endocrinologist aware of what an ophthalmologist can see? The fact is that the eyes show what is happening throughout the body with diabetes, and different diagnostic devices can detect what’s happening in the retina. For example, our OPTOS digital camera combs the fundus, scans the retina, and allows us to see in high resolution several layers and levels of the retina. There are also other non-invasive tests that allow you to see how the vessels, arteries, and even microscopic capillaries are working. And in turn, the processes happening in the brain, lungs, and nervous system are reflected in the retina.

“So it can turn out that I think everything is fine, but it isn’t?”

It is possible that you really are alright. But in order to not be lulled by analyses that show everything is just fine, go to the endocrinologist and ask to see the ophthalmologist, as well. If there are problems in the retina, then everything is not ok. That’s why if you care about yourself, you need to regularly get your eyes checked.

S. Varo